Our recent landing page case study on Thread.com (read here) was well received so we thought that we would do another one.

One that came to our attention (thanks to Simon our senior ppc account manager) recently was Bellroy Wallets¬†which is a clean, well laid out site, their concept is to “slim your wallet” and the value proposition is “Same 10 Cards & Cash. Very Different Wallets.” The main image on the home page is shown below :

This is a nice concept, visually the sleek wallet on the right is more attractive so by using the image (doesn’t hurt that the other wallet is old and a little tatty, and the image is set on a beach either) they instantly show what their wallets do for people.

More interestingly from a marketing point of view they have a dedicated landing page where they are pushing paid traffic. This can be accessed from the home page under the “Take the challenge” ¬†link.

The “slim your wallet” landing page is a great model to follow to build attention, interest, desire then action, it’s not only well designed it’s interactive too!

Upon hitting the landing page you’ll see this :

1) Good logo placement, not too big, not too small.
2) Text implies you are going to learn, not be sold to.
3) Prominent value proposition.
4) Good use of imagery, old = bad, new = good!
5) Call to action; ‘scroll down to learn how’.

Upon scrolling down the landing page you’ll see the next section :

6) Progress steps, let users know where they are, sets expectations up too : step 1 of four
7) Tell them what they are going to learn.
8) Section heading, imaginatively titled.
9) Preamble to section, builds attention.
10) Interactive button, when clicked shows huge stuffed wallets.
11) Concise sub heading.
12) Well placed imagery and bullet pointed text boxes.
13) Breadcrumb trail to pull you to the next section.

The next section of the landing page moves to “fix the problem” mode :

14) Showing where the user is; Step two of four.
15) Tell them what they are going to learn.
16) Section heading.
17) Call to action; Take your wallet out.
18) Breadcrumb to keep eyes moving down the page.
19) Educate the user; Tip section.
20) Good use of imagery, too much text is no good!
21)  Interactive area, too much reading is boring, clicking helps keep interest.
22) Concise but useful tip text.
23) Indicator that there are two more images to see, not everyone will see the < and > symbols.

The next screen on the landing page is the “finish” screen on the education side of the page :

24) Breadcrumb trail leading the eye every downwards.
25) Big “you did it” congratulations sign.
26) Statement of accomplishment.
27) Great use of moving imagery; slowly bounces up and down.
28) Positive statement.
29) Call to action to press the button.
30) Call to action to “become a slim ninja” (jumps to next section if pressed)
31) Breadcrumb trail, it’s worked so far so why not one more time!

The next section on the landing page is to consolidate what their offering is, part 1) :

32) Different background colour, conveys different content, breaks the monotony up too.
33) Telling the user where they are; step three of four.
34)  Telling what they are going to learn.
35)  Section heading.
36)  Sub heading.
37) Breadcrumb trail, could have squashed content but use of space adds design clarity.
38) Company philosophy section, point 1.
39) Concise text, neither too much or too little, just right.
40) Strong use of imagery to make a strong visual impact on the product’s value.
41) Interactive slider, really impacts when you move it just how great their product is.
42) Breadcrumb trail, it’s worked well so far, you are still here so comply and read on!

Image below of the wallets when the slider in point 41 above is moved to the maximum setting of 10 cards plus cash :

This tool and resulting imagery alone sells the product to me instantly!

The second part of this section on the landing page is below :

43) Breadcrumbs still working nicely!
44) Telling the user what they are going to learn.
45) Concise text again, less is more!
46) High quality imagery.
47) Interactive element again, makes the user get involved.
48) Image indicator, highlights to the user there are four screens.
49) Yup, you guessed it.. more breadcrumbs!

The final screen on this great landing page, finally, it’s been a long journey down the page but you are still reading and so will be most users on this landing page!

50) Telling the user they are on the final screen.
51) Telling the user what they are going to learn.
52) Subheading that directs the user to continue.
53) Question, great sales starts with a question, makes the user sell it to themselves.
54) Choice, “do you want a wallet?” becomes “Which wallet suits you best?”
55) Clear buyer type classification, “Folded” or “Flat” bills.
56) Clarification statement, explains more clearly the quality each wallet style possess.
57) Great product naming conventions, “Card Sleeve”, “Very Small”, “Very Protective” etc.
58) Transparency; Quantifies how many cards will fit.
59) Good call to action; “SHOP” not “BUY NOW” – leads user to a very focussed product page.
60) Pricing, clear, on the page but smaller than the SHOP button.
61) High quality imagery, with pop up when hovered over.
62) Transparency; indicator of qualities, Slim versus featured.
63) Exit buttons options: keeps users on site, back to home page and view range.
64) Social Media buttons, user may not buy but may like product and share.

This brand, site, products and landing page rocks, high quality design, copyrighting and imagery all play a part to educate, entertain and ultimately sell to the user in a very low impact way.

This landing page goes in from an educational point of view, rather than straight into a sales pitch, they could have led with their materials sourcing, the tanning process, the manufacturing process and why their wallets are of the highest quality but the imagery on site conveys the quality anyway and they instead focus upon solving a very common problem of fat, bulging wallets that stick in people’s pockets.

Check out the actual landing page here, go play with the interactive elements and see how it draws you into their products.

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